Thursday, May 13, 2021

Music Review //
Electric Treatment Free
"Electric Treatment Free [EP]"

 




When this EP begins there is this sound which makes me feel like someone is singing "na na na na" but it's actually the music singing.   This turns into the sound of a xylophone trill and it goes on this loop which feels magical at times and at other times I'm reminded of the song "Blister In The Sun".    The tones continue though as if being played on a piano but in that clanky sense like when you hit the keys and they just make that ivory hitting wood sound rather than the actual music notes.   This crosses over into a theme like "Knight Rider" as the pace quickens.  Blissed out notes open behind the song now and as much as this can feel like electronics it also feels acoustic and one with nature.

An audio clip comes in saying "This is the greatest moment of my life" to open "andrei's bright day".    There is some soothing waves of air coming through with the audio clip on a loop and then when it stops there is just this loud, primal, human scream.   This turns into pianos which remind me of Charlie Brown and they are being played somewhat like a song, somewhat like a freestyle.  In some ways you feel like he's just randomly striking the keys on a piano, but at the same time if you were to try to do that yourself it wouldn't have the same sound so you know it's all deliberate and part of the song.

A phone rings as if we are calling someone on "the brother of sleep".   A generic answering voice mail thing comes on and then an audio clip starts about feeling well and bathing every day.  There is some static in here which makes it sound like it's raining and then this carousel like tone pattern repeats as well.  This whole audio clip being read as a letter makes me think it's someone from camp but it sounds more like an adult than a child.  We switch over to an audio clip about a third person walking with us, hooded, and I kind of have to feel that is a reference to death.  The way this seems to go from youth (summer camp) to old age (death following us around) is really quite brilliant.

On the fourth song we hear- perhaps for the first time- a guitar which has notes and chords being strummed.  This song is actually called "maths (conlon guitars)" and in some way it does remind me of what is considered to be math rock, but it also can have some folk punk and post rock vibes in it just as well.  It's just a nice, somewhat acoustic, fast paced song showcasing what a guitar can do.   The notes can climb up higher while the chords tend to go down lower into the bass.  

The final song- "fort smith"- begins with some isolated jazz pianos.   The speed at which the notes are played can make this one feel urgent, somewhat suspenseful, but then it is just as quick to drop off into silence.   This song takes a moment to breathe and then comes back as distorted rock, almost closer to metal than anything else.  The way this distorted guitar just cuts through, then an audio clip comes through like cops talking on their walkies.   We turn into this blissed out sort of tone set which makes me feel like we're more connected with the other songs and I think that while the songs on this EP can be different (even just within the song itself) little things like these pleasant tones can bring the whole EP together.  


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